The Rise and Decline of Science in Islamic Civilization

  • Ayub K Ommaya Department of Neurosurgery, George Washington University, Washington, D.C. and Foundation for Fundamental and Applied Neuroscience Bethesda, Maryland, United States of America
Keywords: Islamic civilization, Muslim scientists, Islamic scientific contributions, Mughal Empire, Ottoman Empire, Mongol invasion

Abstract

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5915/22-1-13526

The rise of science in the Islamic civilization was the direct consequence of the unique transformation of human minds by Islam. As Islam spread to other nations, Muslims were exposed to other societies and their civilizations. There was a remarkable in-gathering and synthesis of human knowledge. Islamic scientists dominated the scene for several centuries but gradually science started to suffer a decline along with the decline of the political eminence of the Muslim state. The factors both extrinsic and intrinsic for this decline are discussed.

Presented as the Al-Razi Memorial Lecture, 21st Annual Convention, Islamic Medical Association of North America, Anaheim, California
July, 1988

Author Biography

Ayub K Ommaya, Department of Neurosurgery, George Washington University, Washington, D.C. and Foundation for Fundamental and Applied Neuroscience Bethesda, Maryland, United States of America

Department of Neurosurgery, George Washington University, Washington, D.C. and Foundation for Fundamental and Applied Neuroscience
Bethesda, Maryland, United States of America

M.d.

Published
1990-01-01
Section
Islamic Perspectives